Indole based non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV

Indole based non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV

Technology Description

This invention describes a novel indole based non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that is potent against HIV, with an IC50 value of 1nM, which exceeds the potency of any currently marketed anti-HIV agent. Furthermore, this compound exhibits low toxicity with a CC50 of only 30µM, providing a therapeutic index of over 30,000.
This compound will be of value to any drug development company that is seeking to develop novel treatments for HIV.
A provisional South African patent application has been filed (2013/07447).
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The compound in question utilises an indole scaffold, substituted at the 2-, 3- and 5- positions to optimise interactions within the allosteric pocket of HIV RT. Key features of the compound include a double hydrogen bonding interaction to Lys101, facilitated by the indole NH and the substituent at the 2-position. The substituent at the 3-position fulfils two important roles: The first of these is a - stacking interaction with Tys181, as well as a - interaction with the conserved residue, Trp229. The second interaction is occupation of a small hydrophobic pocket located in the vicinity of Val179. This particular substituent on the indole scaffold was designed to be somewhat flexible in comparison to our previous generation inhibitors. The result was a 100X improvement in potency. At the 5-position of the scaffold a halogen substituent effectively occupies another small hydrophobic pocket.

 

Target Industries

Pharmaceutical market

Unique Features/Benefits

  • Very potent novel NNRTI

  • Short synthetic sequence potentially simple to scale up.

  • Highly potent indole based NNRTI, with very low toxicity

  • Interactions optimised for - stacking interaction with Tys181, as well as a - interaction with the conserved residue, Trp229.

Innovation Status

A working prototype exists and a provisional South African patent application has been filed (2013/07447).

Principal Researchers

Dr SC Pelly, Senior lecturer Synthetic and Medicinal Chemistry; Dept. of Chemistry and Polymer Science, Stellenbosch University.

Prof WAL van Otterlo, Professor of synthetic chemistry; Dept. of chemistry and polymer science, Stellenbosch University.

Dr A Basson, Senior Medical Scientist; HIV Virology, National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD).

Ms Ronel Mϋller, MSc student; Dept. of chemistry and polymer science, Stellenbosch University.

Available for licensing

Yes

TTO

Thandiwe Maretlane
tmaretlane@sun.ac.za

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